Something I've noticed, and some questions

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Scarf

EPFer

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Post Sun Nov 16, 2008 3:17 am

Something I've noticed, and some questions

Maybe it's just me. But I've read a lot of the stories on OCMB, ESMB and here and some others. One thing that stands out is that the ex's consistently can't spell uncommon words. Is that a product of study tech or what? It goes beyond using spell-check in that it's also a constant misuse of homophones, words that sound alike but are spelled differently and have different meanings. Of course, I know the general population is losing the ability to do that anyway, but I have seen quite a bit of it here. I was wondering if they teach you about parts of speech and related subjects in English classes. What exactly do you get taught in Scilon schools anyway? Scilon, I love that word, being a BSG fan and all.
Now these three things are for always: faith, hope and love, and the greatest of these is love.
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evan

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Post Sun Nov 16, 2008 5:08 am

Re: Something I've noticed, and some questions

Scarf wrote:One thing that stands out is that the ex's consistently can't spell uncommon words. Is that a product of study tech or what?

I honestly haven't noticed any kind of disproportionate spelling ability here compared to elsewhere. I think since Gmail and on-the-fly spell check in forum software like this is making spelling an obsolete art, but that's obvious.

I'm no fan, but if anything, study tech would probably make you a better speller since it forces you to look up in a dictionary any and every word you don't understand while reading. You basically have to take words seriously.

Scarf wrote:... constant misuse of homophones, words that sound alike but are spelled differently and have different meanings.

Mixing up there and their is a global phenomenon that even smart people are susceptible to. I know you wouldn't want to point out specific examples of what you're talking about out of politeness, but I don't see anything particularly out of the ordinary in the Scientology community.

Basically, it might be a good idea to take into consideration that a "Scientology School Education" isn't standardized, but is essentially what the curricula planners think you should know, or think is common knowledge. Since public schools are demonized, there's no desire to emulate. Scientology schools are actually pretty elitist and assume that they're giving a much better education than a public school would give you.

Everybody's circumstances are different. I spent months at a time out of school, between 9-13, but I did read young adult or adult fantasy, maybe to escape the dreariness of the cadet org. My math sucked, but I was placed into English Honors when I started as a freshman in high school. My teachers thought my papers were plagiarized. (I admit, I had to check the spelling of plagiarized.:D)

Scarf wrote:I was wondering if they teach you about parts of speech and related subjects in English classes.

There are no particular English, math or science classes, at least where I went, but you do learn parts of speech in Learning How to Learn. It teaches you what nouns, verbs, propositions, etc are. I think I ended up doing it two or three times, since I kept getting thrown around into different schools.

Scarf wrote:What exactly do you get taught in Scilon schools anyway?

Subjects are put into linear courses that you generally do at your own pace, called checksheets. After you complete a step, you check it off. Steps for a geology course would be like, go outside and find five rocks, make a demonstration for yourself of how tectonic plates move, look up the definition of volcano, etc. This brings back memories, actually.

There's a large degree of personal freedom, but you are assigned targets to finish portions of your checksheets and get in trouble if you don't meet the targets by a deadline. You generally work alone or with a "buddy," and meet the wrath of the teacher when you fall behind target.

Essentially, there shouldn't be a reason why Scientology-born kids would have problems with spelling or word usage unless they didn't have enough school or weren't exposed to enough English. I wish I could have just gone to public school from the beginning, but not having gone is mostly just a difference in childhood experience, rather than some kind of disability or current problem.
"And stay happy!" - Philip Gale
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Iknowtoomuch

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Post Sun Nov 16, 2008 7:08 am

Depends on if they were Scientology kids or not. I ended up with an 8th grade education. And have worked hard over the years to correct that.
"Everybody has a right to believe what they want to believe. But I don't believe that anybody has a right to trick anybody, to hurt anybody, to harm some body, for their own purposes." - Jason Beghe
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Grundy

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Post Sun Nov 16, 2008 5:35 pm

It is deliberate in some instances. Others - it is just as annoying to me. But I haven't noticed it anymore on this site than any other.
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RLSteve

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Post Mon Nov 17, 2008 10:07 am

Re: Something I've noticed, and some questions

evan wrote:Basically, it might be a good idea to take into consideration that a "Scientology School Education" isn't standardized, but is essentially what the curricula planners think you should know, or think is common knowledge. Since public schools are demonized, there's no desire to emulate. Scientology schools are actually pretty elitist and assume that they're giving a much better education than a public school would give you.


I don't think WAyOK was elitist, but I'm sure the teachers had some model off of which to design the curriculum for their grades. I'm sure they researched what was standard for 5th grade, 6th grade, 7th grade, etc.

There are no particular English, math or science classes, at least where I went, but you do learn parts of speech in Learning How to Learn. It teaches you what nouns, verbs, propositions, etc are. I think I ended up doing it two or three times, since I kept getting thrown around into different schools.


That's Grammar and Communication, not Learning How to Learn. But they're in the same series, which also includes How To Use A Dictionary.

Essentially, there shouldn't be a reason why Scientology-born kids would have problems with spelling or word usage unless they didn't have enough school or weren't exposed to enough English. I wish I could have just gone to public school from the beginning, but not having gone is mostly just a difference in childhood experience, rather than some kind of disability or current problem.


I do have to say I think in general, the kids at WAyOK were smarter than the kids at my non-Scientology middle school. My middle school had a little bit more in the way of electives and much more structured curriculum and way less laissez-faire... but WAyOK kids simply had better study habits.

One thing I like about Scientology schools, they're not going to label kids as being ADD or having learning disabilities. My non-Scientology middle school was full of kids on ritalin and other special needs kids. As a matter of fact, I'm under the impression that my non-Scientology middle school was kind of an "alternative" private school for kids who weren't bright enough to get accepted into good, reputable private schools (not that I was a dumb kid, but there was one private school I didn't get accepted into because the teachers there didn't think I'd fit in socially). I mean, don't get me wrong, not all the kids were learning disabled, there were plenty of smart kids, too.

I think it's important for Scientology kids who only got to go to Scientology schools to get the perspective of a kid who went to wog schools BEFORE going to Scientology schools.

I never went to public school past kindergarten, but I can tell you what my wog private school was like. The classes were small, about twelve students per teacher. Public schools have bigger classes, and students can't receive as much individual attention. That's why many parents who have money opt to send their kids to smaller private schools. Lots of parents would send their kids to my school if their kid hadn't been doing particularly well in their previous school, hoping that their grades and the quality of their education would improve. Anyway, if my small private wog middle school was full of kids with learning problems, I can only imagine what public school would be like.

This school was about the same size as or perhaps slightly bigger than WAyOK. I think in general I learned more at the wog school than I did during my time at WAyOK, but... I think the WAyOK kids were smarter, more intelligent... and that was because they had better study habits.

I definitely think there's benefits in the way Delphi's educational system is set up over the traditional educational system.

But I want to stress.... public school is not necessarily a better alternative to a Scientology school for producing brighter, smarter kids. Evan, you entered public school with a Scientology school foundation, that's probably why you were more apt in English. You may not have fared so well if you had had public school your whole life.
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evan

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Post Mon Nov 17, 2008 4:41 pm

Re: Something I've noticed, and some questions

RLSteve wrote:I don't think WAyOK was elitist, but I'm sure the teachers had some model off of which to design the curriculum for their grades. I'm sure they researched what was standard for 5th grade, 6th grade, 7th grade, etc.


Maybe not WAOK, but Columbia Academy felt like it. It was almost like the precursor to Delphi. Maybe it was just me.

RLSteve wrote:That's Grammar and Communication, not Learning How to Learn. But they're in the same series, which also includes How To Use A Dictionary.


Haha oh yeah, it's starting to come back to me now. I think I just grouped them all together in my memory.

RLSteve wrote:Anyway, if my small private wog middle school was full of kids with learning problems, I can only imagine what public school would be like.


I ended up going to two high schools, one in a poor neighborhood and one in a richer neighborhood, and "learning problems" weren't really an issue in either. I was aware that people could be diagnosed with ADD or ADHD and given ritalin, and that kids were generally over-diagnosed, but I don't think I hung out with people who had it. At least not that I knew of, anyway. The main issue, at least for my parents, was the prevalence of "psych" counselors and antidepressants, which my high school girlfriend was on. It was a point of contention with my dad at one point.

RLSteve wrote:You may not have fared so well if you had had public school your whole life.


Maybe, maybe not. Who knows, I may have done better. It's not like I'm a prodigy, but if I were, I would have liked a better sense of my ability through broader comparison in a bigger school, and possibly more support in special programs. I mostly wished I could have gone public the whole way to know more people going into high school, since being the new kid sucks (as I'm sure you know), and have a better sense of empathy or solidarity with everyone I have to deal with now. Basically, it would have been nice not to be so sheltered growing up.

It is kind of pointless me talking about hypotheticals though. I also could have been hit and killed by a public school bus or fallen down an open manhole on my way to public middle school. :D
"And stay happy!" - Philip Gale
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Walker.

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Post Sun Nov 30, 2008 9:10 am

Scarff no matter what these noobs tell you i will answer your question clearly.

Yes they have terrible educations, it's part of why anonymous and I deal with scientology. Scientology prevents a lot of opportunities for our young people and our worthless bureaucrat government does nothing.
And this just feels like spinning plates
Our bodies floating down the muddy river
-Radiohead
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Reura

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Post Mon Apr 08, 2013 2:39 am

Re: Something I've noticed, and some questions

I went to an Applied Scholastics school in Northern Virginia for a few years in elementary and middle school and one thing that I noticed is that they taught us how to spell phonetically. It was a big part of the pre-k program from what I remember and it still gets me to this day. When I was in public school they did a series of tests on my learning ability and that was one of the things they pointed out to my parents along with the fact that I have dysgraphia, which may or may not be a product of how I was taught to write and spell in my early education.

I can't say the same for other Scientology schools, but I know from some of my friends who went there with me that they still teach this way, at least the younger kids.

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