Delphi Education: Good or Crappy?

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RLSteve

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Post Mon Mar 24, 2008 9:35 am

It sounds like you really weren't interested in Delphi's graduation program or too motivated to finish up your Form.

It's too bad they didn't let you go on a special program. When I decided when I was 17 that that would be my last year at Delphi, I opted to go on a special program. I wanted to quit my algebra course? They didn't make me finish it. I didn't want to do the reading program anymore? I didn't have to. I didn't want to do current events? I didn't have to. I just worked on courses that I was interested in! It was great and a lot less stressful.

Hey Kendra, how did Delphi LA handle tardiness or no-shows?

Up in Oregon, there was a penalty point system. If you flunked room check, you would receive 1 penalty point. If you flunked white glove check, you would receive 2 penalty points. If you were late for any class, you would receive two penalty points. If you were more than fifteen minutes late or a no-show, you would receive 4 penalty points.

If you received four penalty points in one week, you would be "restricted" for the following week. During this restriction time, you would not be allowed to go into the Rec Room, you would not be allowed to leave campus, you would not be allowed to participate in weekend activities, and you would have to work for six hours in the scullery!
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Tru2form

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Post Mon Mar 24, 2008 9:46 am

RLSteve wrote:It sounds like you really weren't interested in Delphi's graduation program or too motivated to finish up your Form.

It's too bad they didn't let you go on a special program. When I decided when I was 17 that that would be my last year at Delphi, I opted to go on a special program. I wanted to quit my algebra course? They didn't make me finish it. I didn't want to do the reading program anymore? I didn't have to. I didn't want to do current events? I didn't have to. I just worked on courses that I was interested in! It was great and a lot less stressful.

Hey Kendra, how did Delphi LA handle tardiness or no-shows?

Up in Oregon, there was a penalty point system. If you flunked room check, you would receive 1 penalty point. If you flunked white glove check, you would receive 2 penalty points. If you were late for any class, you would receive two penalty points. If you were more than fifteen minutes late or a no-show, you would receive 4 penalty points.

If you received four penalty points in one week, you would be "restricted" for the following week. During this restriction time, you would not be allowed to go into the Rec Room, you would not be allowed to leave campus, you would not be allowed to participate in weekend activities, and you would have to work for six hours in the scullery!


Well, honestly, I started out that period of my life being very interested in moving up the forms. I really was. After 6 months of that, though, I was so angry and disgusted that I didn't trust anyone anymore. By then, no, I had absolutely NO interest in doing anything at school other than writing.

Home was a refuge from school. School was a refuge from home. So I didn't want to be in either place.

But I like this back-and-forth we're having. I like the negative-positive discussion. There are things I liked about Delphi, and things you disliked, and I think this discussion has been a very positive thing.

If I recall, the way it worked was if you had 5 late points for the week, meaning if you were late to class a total of 5 times, you were not allowed to go on field trips. Since Delphi LA isn't a boarding school, they couldn't really restrict you to campus.

If you were more than an hour late, there were other penalities. Ethics, if I recall. I don't really see anything wrong with that - all schools penalize tardiness, and Delphi LA wasn't so terribly bad about this.
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RLSteve

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Post Mon Mar 24, 2008 10:05 am

Tru2form wrote:If I recall, the way it worked was if you had 5 late points for the week, meaning if you were late to class a total of 5 times, you were not allowed to go on field trips.


How often did you guys have field trips?
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Tru2form

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Post Mon Mar 24, 2008 10:09 am

RLSteve wrote:
Tru2form wrote:If I recall, the way it worked was if you had 5 late points for the week, meaning if you were late to class a total of 5 times, you were not allowed to go on field trips.


How often did you guys have field trips?


When we were younger, every Friday, sometimes every other Friday, sometimes once a month.

When we got older, around Form 5 or 6, it was more sporadic. Usually once a month, or every other Friday.
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RLSteve

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Post Mon Mar 24, 2008 10:30 am

Tru2form wrote:When we were younger, every Friday, sometimes every other Friday, sometimes once a month.

When we got older, around Form 5 or 6, it was more sporadic. Usually once a month, or every other Friday.


Oh, wow, that's so cool!

From ages eight through ten, I went to this really small elementary school with only 12 kids in the whole school (it wasn't a Scientology school) and EVERY Friday, we went on a field trip. It could be anything from seeing a play at the Seattle Children's Theatre, the zoo, ice skating, the Seattle Pacific Science Center, etc. And every day, after the field trip, we'd make a page, draw pictures and write about our day for our field trip book. Years later as an adult, I discovered these old field trip books I had made as a child. Awww.... memories..... Looking back on that, I think that was really cool that I got to go to a school like that.

Not too get off topic from Delphi, I just think it's cool that Delphi LA had field trips all the time.

Delphi Oregon had field trips all the time in the summer session, trips to Victoria, Seattle, Bend, the Shakespeare Festival in Ashland, camping in the sand dunes, etc. In the fall, we usually had a camping trip with hiking, white water rafting, etc. I always loved those trips. In the winter, there was usually a ski trip. Usually once a year, the business seminar would have a week long trip to a city like New York.

The school always sold tickets to the latest Broadway show playing in Portland. I always loved these trips. I saw so many musicals with Delphi. Occasionally, we'd have trips into nearby towns to the movie theatre, too.

<Sigh>... I miss all those huge group activities at Delphi.
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Post Wed Mar 26, 2008 3:10 am

A new law was recently passed in California mandating that all schooling must be taught by accredited, certified teachers. The big uproar is that this makes homeschooling effectively illegal. What I want to know is what does this mean for Delphi LA?
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Post Wed Mar 26, 2008 3:13 am

breezy wrote:A new law was recently passed in California mandating that all schooling must be taught by accredited, certified teachers. The big uproar is that this makes homeschooling effectively illegal. What I want to know is what does this mean for Delphi LA?


Good question! Never thought I would say this (as a native Oregonian) but, hooray for California!! 8)
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RLSteve

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Post Wed Mar 26, 2008 4:08 am

AnonyMozart wrote:
breezy wrote:A new law was recently passed in California mandating that all schooling must be taught by accredited, certified teachers. The big uproar is that this makes homeschooling effectively illegal. What I want to know is what does this mean for Delphi LA?


Good question! Never thought I would say this (as a native Oregonian) but, hooray for California!! 8)


Wow.... how long does it take for a teacher to become accredited and certified? I imagine that Delphi will either be pushing its faculty to becoming accredited super fast, or they will get together with other non-Scientology private school teachers and try and fight this law.

It's nice to know that there are some standards, but on the other hand.... doesn't this interfere with the parents' right to educate their kids the way they want to?

And AnonyMozart, you certainly seem to have it in for Delphi just because it's a Scientology school.
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Post Wed Mar 26, 2008 7:16 am

RLSteve wrote:Wow.... how long does it take for a teacher to become accredited and certified? I imagine that Delphi will either be pushing its faculty to becoming accredited super fast, or they will get together with other non-Scientology private school teachers and try and fight this law.


Not sure about California laws, but in OR, one has to have a masters degree and pass numerous tests to become a certified teacher in a public school. The requirement for private school teaching is less stringent.

RLSteve wrote:It's nice to know that there are some standards, but on the other hand.... doesn't this interfere with the parents' right to educate their kids the way they want to?

Aren't you glad there are high standards for teachers? Don't you want your future kids to have the best teachers? Yes, parents have a right to have input into their kids' education. But trust me on this, there are sooooo many parents out there who are unfit to teach anyone anything...
There are definite success stories in homeschooling, yes. But they are few and far between. More often than not, the student comes back to the public schools after a failed home-school experience, and are way behind academically and socially.
RLSteve wrote: And AnonyMozart, you certainly seem to have it in for Delphi just because it's a Scientology school.

Yeah, I guess I do. It's precisely because it's a scientology school. I am sure there are great, caring teachers at Delphi, OR (Delphi LA sounds lame). And I am glad you had a good time there. But the fact remains, students are being indoctrinated with scientology teachings which are damaging. Doesn't the fact that young kids are being fed LRH's lies irk you in the least?
Scientology, how about that? You hold on the the tin cans and then this guy asks you a bunch of questions, and if you pay enough money, you get to join the master race. How's that for a 'religion'? - Frank Zappa
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RLSteve

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Post Wed Mar 26, 2008 8:18 am

AnonyMozart wrote:Aren't you glad there are high standards for teachers? Don't you want your future kids to have the best teachers?


I don't think we should take for granted what our government considers workable in education. Just because a teacher is certified in certain standards doesn't necessarily mean the teacher is a good teacher or that the system is effective. We should not take for granted that our current system of education is effective.

Isn't this the purpose of private schools? To provide educational alternatives if we lack faith in the public school system?

It's true, a lot of private schools are worse than public schools. I went to three non-Scientology private schools before going to Delphi. I can't say these schools were bad necessarily, but I think in a way, I was too sheltered and as a result, I didn't develop a lot of street smarts. (And at one of my schools which I went to for three years, I was the only boy in my class) I constantly wonder if my life would be better if I had gone to public school during my elementary and middle school years.

Yes, parents have a right to have input into their kids' education. But trust me on this, there are sooooo many parents out there who are unfit to teach anyone anything...
There are definite success stories in homeschooling, yes. But they are few and far between. More often than not, the student comes back to the public schools after a failed home-school experience, and are way behind academically and socially.


Oh, I definitely agree on this. My mom (not a Scientologist) is constantly taking my younger sister with PDD out of school and homeschooling her. My little sister has been in and out of school her whole life. Now, my mom is certainly not qualified to be homeschooling any child, however... I can't say I can vouch much for the education system at my sister's school either. Even though these teachers may be certified, they certainly lack time and resources for a child with special needs like my sister.

My mom seems to think my sister learns more and gets more done being home schooled than she does in her public school. And if that's true, that is sad because my mom at best as a middle school education, never went to high school, never had a career. She's one of those "welfare" type of moms, living off of my sister's SSI.

Yeah, I guess I do. It's precisely because it's a scientology school. I am sure there are great, caring teachers at Delphi, OR (Delphi LA sounds lame). And I am glad you had a good time there. But the fact remains, students are being indoctrinated with scientology teachings which are damaging.


I don't think it's necessarily damaging. It's true I don't agree with everything that goes on there, but I don't think it's the worst place to send your kids to school. Of course, there is the risk of converting to Scientology, which happened with me and I ended up disconnecting from my mother. But if there weren't abuses happening within the Church such as disconnection and anti-critical thinking, it wouldn't be such a big deal if people converted to Scientology.

I have no problem with Scientology being taught as a philosophy. And you have to remember, all Delphi is is a school with an alternative approach to education, the Hubbard approach. There's definitely pros and cons when you compare it to a regular school. There are other schools with alternative educational approaches, there's the Montessori schools, the Waldorf schools, etc.

Doesn't the fact that young kids are being fed LRH's lies irk you in the least?


Personally, I'm more bugged by kids being indoctrinated into Christianity at a Christian school. But... that doesn't mean I'd rule out the idea of sending my children to a private Christian school if the school had good statistics and good programs.
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Post Wed Mar 26, 2008 1:52 pm

RLSteve wrote:
Anonspring wrote:I read in another account (Dear Amanda) that Delphi school graduates aren't accepted in most colleges because of this, so I was very surprised to hear you say that it is a good school. Since you've actually attended the school this is a chance to see for myself.


Yeah, I read that. But it's not true that most Delphi graduates (at least Delphi Oregon graduates) don't get accepted into Universities. That might be true about Delphi LA, but at Delphi Oregon, every year, we'd have Alumni visiting at Alumni weekend talking about college life.

My theory is that the parent who researched the colleges only inquired about Delphi LA, not about Delphi Oregon. I think Delphi LA was listing universities that had accepted graduates of Delphi Oregon, and that's why the parent thought Delphi was lying about students being accepted into Universities.


I must be right about my theory, here is a quote from that Dear Amanda account:

Jennifer Rowe Havlicek, Admissions Counselor for M.I.T., wrote, on May 20, 1997, "Our records show that there have been no students from Delphi Academy who have applied to Massachusetts Institute of Technology..."


You may have heard of Philip Gale. He was the youngest person to graduate Delphi Oregon, graduating at age 14 in 1993. He was a student at MIT and he committed suicide by jumping out a window on L. Ron Hubbard's birthday in 1998. So obviously, in their brochure, Delphi LA is obviously listing universities that have accepted graduates from ANY Delphi school. MIT didn't accept any students from Delphi Academy in LA, but they did accept a student from the Delphian School in Oregon.
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Post Wed Mar 26, 2008 7:34 pm

RLSteve wrote:
AnonyMozart wrote:Aren't you glad there are high standards for teachers? Don't you want your future kids to have the best teachers?


I don't think we should take for granted what our government considers workable in education. Just because a teacher is certified in certain standards doesn't necessarily mean the teacher is a good teacher or that the system is effective. We should not take for granted that our current system of education is effective.


Of course we should not take for granted that our system is effective. If change is needed, we should fight for change. Parts of the NCLB (no child left behind) act has been detrimental to education in our country, and teachers are fighting to get it repealed or at least amended. If there are things you think are wrong, by all means, lobby for change. If you disagree with the new law in CA, work to get it repealed.

And no, high standards for certification doesn't guarantee that a teacher is good; however, those very standards, at the very least, mean that the teacher is highly trained, can pass strenuous tests, and must show effectiveness in the classroom. Oregon requires teachers to do 60 units of professional development every year to keep their license.

A good teacher shows command of the subject matter, instills a life-long love for learning in her students, and truly cares about each student. There is a saying which rings true for me: "They won't care how much you know until they know how much you care." The rapport between student and teacher is one of the keys to success in learning.

RLSteve wrote: Isn't this the purpose of private schools? To provide educational alternatives if we lack faith in the public school system?

It's true, a lot of private schools are worse than public schools. I went to three non-Scientology private schools before going to Delphi. I can't say these schools were bad necessarily, but I think in a way, I was too sheltered and as a result, I didn't develop a lot of street smarts. (And at one of my schools which I went to for three years, I was the only boy in my class) I constantly wonder if my life would be better if I had gone to public school during my elementary and middle school years.


Some students thrive in private school settings. And others fail miserably. Same with public school. So much depends on the student, their learning styles, their social skills, and how much they are willing to put into their learning. One thing I have seen many times over the years is students who go to strict private schools often go bonkers when they leave that setting, rebelling, doing drugs, etc. Many of them come back around to some sense of normalcy, but sadly, some do not.


RLSteve wrote:My mom (not a Scientologist) is constantly taking my younger sister with PDD out of school and homeschooling her. My little sister has been in and out of school her whole life. Now, my mom is certainly not qualified to be homeschooling any child, however... I can't say I can vouch much for the education system at my sister's school either. Even though these teachers may be certified, they certainly lack time and resources for a child with special needs like my sister.


OK, what is PDD? I have heard of ADD and ADHD, but never PDD. (It's kinda funny - I always thought education had the most acronyms, but scientology has that honor, hands down...) When she is in school, is your sister in special ed? Does she have an IEP (individual education plan)? You can be an advocate for your sister. Demand that she has an IEP and that all is being done under the law to meet her special needs.

RLSteve wrote:My mom seems to think my sister learns more and gets more done being home schooled than she does in her public school. And if that's true, that is sad because my mom at best as a middle school education, never went to high school, never had a career. She's one of those "welfare" type of moms, living off of my sister's SSI.

This is the kind of thing that CA is trying to prevent with their new law. Even if your mom has the best of intentions, she probably does not have the necessary skills to effectively teach your sister.


RLSteve wrote:I don't think it's necessarily damaging. It's true I don't agree with everything that goes on there, but I don't think it's the worst place to send your kids to school. Of course, there is the risk of converting to Scientology, which happened with me and I ended up disconnecting from my mother. But if there weren't abuses happening within the Church such as disconnection and anti-critical thinking, it wouldn't be such a big deal if people converted to Scientology.


Hellloooo, disconnection, anti-critical thinking - you just gave two huge reasons why scientology and its schools can be damaging. You left out the crush of self-esteem due to the para-military discipline enforcement.

RLSteve wrote: I have no problem with Scientology being taught as a philosophy. And you have to remember, all Delphi is is a school with an alternative approach to education, the Hubbard approach. There's definitely pros and cons when you compare it to a regular school. There are other schools with alternative educational approaches, there's the Montessori schools, the Waldorf schools, etc.

Montessori is based upon sound, proven educational techniques and has a proven track record.
Scientology is not a philosophy, and Hubbard is not a philosopher (although Delphi's website gives him that status).
The man was a deluded, power-hungry liar whose rantings are now being spewed and further twisted by another deluded, power-hungry liar: Miscavige.
If you think Delphi is just an innocuous alternative approach to education, I think you are being naive. Delphi claims to be non-sectarian, yet forces their students to use LRH's study technology, which is a core belief of co$.
Delphi's main agenda, IMO, is to churn out loyal scientologists. Follow the money:
According to the standard Applied Scholastic licence agreement, Delphi is paying 4% of their gross income (before costs) to ABLE (as of February 2007). Likely it is more. Additionally, they have to pay the WISE fees, and an IAS donation from time to time, when a "reg cycle" comes up. That is no small chunk-o'-change, considering the $32 K yearly tuition. It would be interesting to know how much they pay their supervisors at Delphi.

Also, this from "A Piece of Blue Sky": "The headmaster of Delphi, in Oregon, has claimed that children who are not educated in Scientology schools are being "psychwashed" by the educational system. Further, he has said that Delphi wants non-Scientologist children so that the Scientology children, who are being trained to become leaders, can gain experience in dealing with "wogs." 1. Alan Larson circular letters, 17 June 1985, 19 August 1987

AnonyMozart wrote:Doesn't the fact that young kids are being fed LRH's lies irk you in the least?


RLSteve wrote:Personally, I'm more bugged by kids being indoctrinated into Christianity at a Christian school. But... that doesn't mean I'd rule out the idea of sending my children to a private Christian school if the school had good statistics and good programs.

Personally, I would far rather my kids learn about the love of Jesus Christ than the lies of Hubbard.
Scientology, how about that? You hold on the the tin cans and then this guy asks you a bunch of questions, and if you pay enough money, you get to join the master race. How's that for a 'religion'? - Frank Zappa
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Fortunate Fool

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Post Wed Mar 26, 2008 8:18 pm

RLSteve wrote:I don't think it's necessarily damaging. It's true I don't agree with everything that goes on there, but I don't think it's the worst place to send your kids to school. Of course, there is the risk of converting to Scientology, which happened with me and I ended up disconnecting from my mother. But if there weren't abuses happening within the Church such as disconnection and anti-critical thinking, it wouldn't be such a big deal if people converted to Scientology.

I have no problem with Scientology being taught as a philosophy. And you have to remember, all Delphi is is a school with an alternative approach to education, the Hubbard approach. There's definitely pros and cons when you compare it to a regular school. There are other schools with alternative educational approaches, there's the Montessori schools, the Waldorf schools, etc.

...

Personally, I'm more bugged by kids being indoctrinated into Christianity at a Christian school. But... that doesn't mean I'd rule out the idea of sending my children to a private Christian school if the school had good statistics and good programs.


I agree, some, reservedly. You're right; if it weren't for the apparent abuses of the church, exposing your kids to Scientology itself wouldn't hurt them, and if the education is good, that's really all that should matter.

I'm always down right skeptical of private schools that have religious platforms (and by that I mean those who actually push it. Many of my friends, actually, who are perfectly well adjusted went through Catholic schools with teachers who fortunately were rather skeptical and and open in their teaching, and who were more focused on teaching than their philosophies).

There are problems for me about religious private schools.

One. While a person is opening his trust open to the things his/her teacher/authority is telling him, they generally, for the sake of speed of learning, have their skeptical gaurds down, and absorb what is being told to them at face value. There is nothing wrong with presenting Scientology or Christian philosophy, in say, a critical, analytical, and downright skeptical light. Unfortunately this is such a difficult thing for a teacher to do, as the balance has as much to do with the student composition itself than just with the teacher or class program.

Two. Education is power. It's social power, it's financial power, it's political power. Call my jaded, but I often see high end religious schools as serving, atleast in some way, the purpose of throwing alot of money at a majority indoctrinated crowd of people so that they can have the best facilities and qualified teachers to break into the better jobs, schools, and social standing.

So, whatever. You're right, but I'm reserved :)
"You know, I'm sick of following my dreams, man. I'm just going to ask where they're going and hook up with 'em later." -- Mitch Hedberg
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Post Wed Mar 26, 2008 10:13 pm

AnonyMozart wrote:OK, what is PDD? I have heard of ADD and ADHD, but never PDD. (It's kinda funny - I always thought education had the most acronyms, but scientology has that honor, hands down...) When she is in school, is your sister in special ed? Does she have an IEP (individual education plan)? You can be an advocate for your sister. Demand that she has an IEP and that all is being done under the law to meet her special needs.


PDD-NOS is Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified. It's an autism spectrum disorder. Basically, my sister is severely delayed in her language development. At eight years old, she had a three year-old vocabulary. At age fifteen, she has the mind and vocabulary of an eight year old.

My mom says that the special ed classes at the school are a joke. My sister has some special ed classes, and some regular classes. But basically, the regular classes are too hard and above the my sister's head, and the special ed classes simply aren't challenging enough for her. My sister is humiliated being in special ed classes, and she is humiliated having trouble keeping up in regular classes. When my sister's IQ was last checked, it was 77. She had a verbal IQ of 72 and a performance IQ of about 87.

Yes, my sister had an IEP, but she lacked one-on-one attention.

Both my mom and my sister agree that my sister is challenged more and learns more at home than in school (except in the regular classes when the challenge is too hard).

Scientology is not a philosophy, and Hubbard is not a philosopher (although Delphi's website gives him that status).


Definition of philosophy -- "A system for guiding life or conduct, esp. personal principles and beliefs."

I'd consider Scientology a philosophy based upon that definition. Study tech, ethics tech are all part of the philosophy of Scientology. Scientology defines itself as "an applied religious philosophy."

Whatever Delphi's motives are, whatever faults it has, I have no doubt in my mind that you can still get a good education there and that their approach with the individual checksheet method is effective for lots of students.
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Post Wed Mar 26, 2008 11:04 pm

RLSteve wrote:PDD-NOS is Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified. It's an autism spectrum disorder. Basically, my sister is severely delayed in her language development. At eight years old, she had a three year-old vocabulary. At age fifteen, she has the mind and vocabulary of an eight year old.

My mom says that the special ed classes at the school are a joke. My sister has some special ed classes, and some regular classes. But basically, the regular classes are too hard and above the my sister's head, and the special ed classes simply aren't challenging enough for her. My sister is humiliated being in special ed classes, and she is humiliated having trouble keeping up in regular classes. When my sister's IQ was last checked, it was 77. She had a verbal IQ of 72 and a performance IQ of about 87.

Yes, my sister had an IEP, but she lacked one-on-one attention.

Both my mom and my sister agree that my sister is challenged more and learns more at home than in school (except in the regular classes when the challenge is too hard).


Well if she does better at home, that is fine. If she does go back to school, there are things that can be done, RL. The federal special ed. laws are very strict - the school district must find the best placement for her, including providing a private tutor (at their expense). There are several autistic students at my school with their own full-time aide who are mainstreamed in some subjects and get one-on-one help in other subjects.

RL Steve wrote: Definition of philosophy -- "A system for guiding life or conduct, esp. personal principles and beliefs."

I'd consider Scientology a philosophy based upon that definition. Study tech, ethics tech are all part of the philosophy of Scientology. Scientology defines itself as "an applied religious philosophy."

On this, we will have to agree to disagree. IMO, scn. is not a religion. "A system for guiding life.." which has destroyed many lives and ripped families apart (including yours). I am surprised at how you still defend it after it has done so much harm to so many.

RLSteve wrote:Whatever Delphi's motives are, whatever faults it has, I have no doubt in my mind that you can still get a good education there and that their approach with the individual checksheet method is effective for lots of students.

And I maintain that a good education can be had for free, without the abuses, without the warped scieno-trappings.
Scientology, how about that? You hold on the the tin cans and then this guy asks you a bunch of questions, and if you pay enough money, you get to join the master race. How's that for a 'religion'? - Frank Zappa
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Post Thu Mar 27, 2008 12:33 am

AnonyMozart wrote:Well if she does better at home, that is fine. If she does go back to school, there are things that can be done, RL. The federal special ed. laws are very strict - the school district must find the best placement for her, including providing a private tutor (at their expense). There are several autistic students at my school with their own full-time aide who are mainstreamed in some subjects and get one-on-one help in other subjects.


I'm not sure my mom is fully informed on the school's resources for autistic kids, but I read your paragraph to her and she says that's pretty much what my sister had at her school. It just wasn't good enough.

On this, we will have to agree to disagree. IMO, scn. is not a religion.


In that case, would you consider that Delphi is a secular school then since Scientology is not a religion?

"A system for guiding life.." which has destroyed many lives and ripped families apart (including yours). I am surprised at how you still defend it after it has done so much harm to so many.


Don't get me wrong, I DESPISE the Church of Scientology. I've gone to both Anonymous protests.

But there are also people who truly feel that Scientology has helped them, just like there are many Christians who have been saved by Jesus. Lots of people have been molested by Catholic priests, but that doesn't mean there aren't a lot of people who feel like Catholicism really helps them.

I always try to make a distinction between the philosophy of Scientology and the group running it. And I'm not saying I agree with everything about its philosophies either, and for the most part, I turn to New Age type books for spiritual philosophies, however... that doesn't mean I don't occasionally run into situations where stuff I learned from Scientology still seems applicable.

Delphi didn't break up my family, the Church of Scientology did. But it's true that Delphi was a stepping stone through that entire process.

IMO, our job as critics is to respect and defend people's right to believe and practice whatever they want, yet still use our voices to try and make a difference regarding the abuses going on.
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AnonyMozart

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Joined: Sun Mar 02, 2008 8:26 pm

Location: Oregon

Post Sun Mar 30, 2008 12:01 am

RLSteve wrote:In that case, would you consider that Delphi is a secular school then since Scientology is not a religion?/


In the same way that $cientology is a scam hiding behind the facade of being a religion, Delphi is an indoctrination station hiding behind the facade of being an educational institution. You have convinced me that some learning does indeed take place there; however, Delphi's agenda is to churn out loyal $cientologists. Having 8 year old children do TRs and calling it 'communication' is ludicrous. Those drills are just the beginning of their brainwashing/hypnosis to make them more suggestable to $cientology.
Scientology, how about that? You hold on the the tin cans and then this guy asks you a bunch of questions, and if you pay enough money, you get to join the master race. How's that for a 'religion'? - Frank Zappa
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RLSteve

Site Admin

Posts: 414

Joined: Sun Mar 02, 2008 3:03 am

Location: Los Angeles, CA

Post Sun Mar 30, 2008 7:44 pm

AnonyMozart wrote:In the same way that $cientology is a scam hiding behind the facade of being a religion, Delphi is an indoctrination station hiding behind the facade of being an educational institution. You have convinced me that some learning does indeed take place there; however, Delphi's agenda is to churn out loyal $cientologists.


I agree with you 100% on this. And providing a good education with high standards, an excellent reading program, a safe environment with high level of school spirit, it is a perfect trap to lure in non-Scientology students and parents.
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anonangel

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Joined: Wed Mar 05, 2008 5:13 am

Post Mon Mar 31, 2008 10:20 am

Wow, I've learned a lot from reading this thread. I home educate through an umbrella program. I'm definitely going to be using some of the things mentioned to help improve my children's education even more. I use a Montessori type teaching method and my kids love it. My oldest is very much an independent studier. My other daughter is more the flighty type, I definitely have to work with her more on maintaining focus compared to my oldest. Lastly, my son, he's special needs so we have a very tailored learning system for him. I worked at a Montessori daycare when they were very young and that was where I learned a lot about their style. I do some teaching/lecturing but I also have the oldest 2 especially do more independent style learning. I will freely admit that I don't have a teaching degree, but I do have an IQ of about 127 and use what I learned from some really good teachers about how to teach. I live in a city were the schools are extremely dangerous, there is no way I will send my kids there. They do have interaction with other kids of varying ages because my friends have kids. I've also had them in 4H and various other programs. Part of why I'm writing this is because part of me agrees with the new California law and part of me doesn't. I've seen both really good home school setting and really bad ones. Personally I think it should be a case by case thing, but that's JMHO. I want to thank you all for sharing your experiences with Delphi, I've learned a lot from it. I've pretty much been a lurker, but education is something near and dear to me.
Angl
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AnonyMozart

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Posts: 53

Joined: Sun Mar 02, 2008 8:26 pm

Location: Oregon

Post Wed Apr 02, 2008 5:49 am

anonangel wrote:Wow, I've learned a lot from reading this thread. I home educate through an umbrella program. I'm definitely going to be using some of the things mentioned to help improve my children's education even more. I use a Montessori type teaching method and my kids love it. My oldest is very much an independent studier. My other daughter is more the flighty type, I definitely have to work with her more on maintaining focus compared to my oldest. Lastly, my son, he's special needs so we have a very tailored learning system for him. I worked at a Montessori daycare when they were very young and that was where I learned a lot about their style. I do some teaching/lecturing but I also have the oldest 2 especially do more independent style learning. I will freely admit that I don't have a teaching degree, but I do have an IQ of about 127 and use what I learned from some really good teachers about how to teach. I live in a city were the schools are extremely dangerous, there is no way I will send my kids there. They do have interaction with other kids of varying ages because my friends have kids. I've also had them in 4H and various other programs. Part of why I'm writing this is because part of me agrees with the new California law and part of me doesn't. I've seen both really good home school setting and really bad ones. Personally I think it should be a case by case thing, but that's JMHO. I want to thank you all for sharing your experiences with Delphi, I've learned a lot from it. I've pretty much been a lurker, but education is something near and dear to me.
Angl

It sounds like you have ingredients for success, including:
1. a loving heart which seeks the best educational situation for your kids
2. a good background in Montessori, and good intellect
3. a true read on the learning styles of each of your kids
4. you are ensuring their interaction with their peers through extra-curricular activities

In my experience, the homeschooling situaton fails when any of the above elements are lacking. I think the CA law is meant to screen out the home-schooling parents who are abusive and/or lazy, which you clearly are not. Best of luck to you, and don't forget to give your kids some music and art as well. :thumbsup:
Scientology, how about that? You hold on the the tin cans and then this guy asks you a bunch of questions, and if you pay enough money, you get to join the master race. How's that for a 'religion'? - Frank Zappa
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